Optimizing Your LinkedIn Profile

Optimizing Your LinkedIn Profile

After fully completing the public profile, the next step is to land on the first page of search engine results. LinkedIn already optimized profiles to land on the first page due to a strong web ranking, so use their resources to make the profile visible.

A profile with a photo is 14x more likely to get views than profiles without a photo. The correct photo to use is a professional photo of you in business clothes. Don’t upload a photo that the boss will find offensive or vulgar.

Use the background image section as a marketing tool. The background photo above the profile photo is a space to add visual personality. Instead of a generic photo, add a company logo, a slogan, or market an upcoming project (a book, a movie, an event, etc) to increase engagement and visibility.

Is the URL unique? The generic LinkedIn URL starts with https://www.linkedin.com/in/your-name-123456j89. A unique URL looks like https://www.linkedin.com/in/yourname. Personalize the generic URL link to a name you can brand. Examples include birth name, a company name, or a slogan.

Endorsements raise search engine results, yet the profile won’t allow self-endorsements. To gain endorsements, fill out the skills section and let the connections do the rest.

Interact in group discussions. Participation is mandatory to make joining a group matter. Active profiles attract other LinkedIn profiles to view the page, increasing engagement and exposure. Increased visibility increases rank in search engine.

Add relatable keywords in the profile. The information in the headline, the summary, the job descriptions, and the education section won’t raise the profile. Nonetheless, adding a keyword to each section will increase exposure when someone searches for it. Take those keywords and add it to each section.

Add media to the profile. Media makes a profile 3-dimensional with concrete proof about your online resume. Upload video, audio, web links, photos, and documents to the correct profile section. Available sections include work history, education, and summary sections.

Add bullets, numbers, and symbols. Generic summary, education, project, and work history section contain paragraph text after paragraph text. Make text lively by adding bullet points and numbered lists. Arrows, stars, trademark, and copyright symbols make the profile pop.

These suggestions will cause an uptick in search engine visibility. As more people see it, the ranking rises. Continue to keep the profile updated while remaining active in group discussions.

Resume Writing Tips to Help You Stand Out

Resume Writing Tips to Help You Stand Out

In today’s highly competitive job market, it’s imperative that a resume stand out in order to move forward in the job application process. Consider the following five tips for creating a resume that gets noticed:

Use bullet points intelligently. Limit bullet points to three per each job listed in the past employment section of the resume. Using too many bullet points can overwhelm the reader and cause important information to be overlooked. List only the most relevant information as bullet points.

Present a strong personal brand. Branding is about rising above the noise and being noticed. Craft a personal brand statement and include it at the beginning of the resume. The personal brand statement should be no longer than five sentences and should communicate an applicant’s personality, mission and unique qualities. Choose a branding color and incorporate it sparingly throughout the resume. For example, use a branding color as a line divider between various sections of the resume.

Use keywords. Many businesses look for certain keywords in an applicant’s resume. Include industry buzzwords or key terms throughout the resume to help attract the attention of the reader. Be careful not to overdo it, which can make the resume seem forced or unnatural. To determine possible important keywords, do a Google search of the industry and look for commonly used terms.

Check for errors. While this may seem like common sense, typos and grammatical errors are common resume writing issues. Presenting an error-free resume shows attention to detail and implied intelligence. After completing the resume, step away for some time and then re-read it to check for mistakes. Have another person read the resume and check for errors, as well. Careful proofreading is key.

Keep it modern. Stay away from overly decorative fonts. Present the content in a clean and easy to read format. Opt for non-serif fonts and use black text against a light background, most commonly white. Use spacing and margins that allow the text to appear non-crowded and organized. Too little whitespace can make the reader feel anxious, giving a bad impression.

Follow these resume-writing tips to author a resume that captures the interviewer’s attention. A resume is often the first impression an interviewer receives about an applicant, so make a powerful first impression with a unique resume.

The Necessity of Professionalism

No matter what industry you work in or who you engage with on a professional level, in today’s world it’s crucial that you possess this one important trait: professionalism. Many people hear the word “professionalism” and think of workers who remove any pretense of individuality under the guise of acting more professional; however, professionalism is simply a set of qualities embodied by a person who behaves in a professional manner in a professional setting. This includes everything from refraining from office gossip to taking ownership for one’s own mistakes. In today’s workplace, professionalism is a necessary trait for all employees to possess as they work together to achieve company goals; here’s why:

Professionalism Helps Maintain Responsibility for One’s Actions

This holds especially true if you’re working in a business where you regularly interact with your customers. Professionalism dictates some best practices for engaging with others in a professional setting and helps to ensure that you best represent of your company. If you’re working directly with customers or clients, you will be held accountable for your behavior, and thus treating a client poorly will reflect poorly upon you, as well as the company as a whole.

Professionalism Allows for Clear Boundaries

Even if you work in a relaxed setting where employees get along and are encouraged to interact with one another, there are still clear cut things that are and are not appropriate to discuss in a work environment. While professionalism dictates proper interaction guidelines when it comes to clients and customers, it also comes into play for interpersonal office relationships as well. By setting up these boundaries, you can help mitigate any conflicts that might arise due to inappropriate interactions and can make the work environment better overall.

Professionalism Promotes Respect

In an environment where professional boundaries and courtesies are not promoted and encouraged, things can quickly spiral out of control. Professionalism allows you not only to demonstrate respect for your coworkers and those in management but also shows the respect that you have for the company in general. It reduces inter office gossip and generally promotes a more cohesive workplace because of the respectful environment. It can also speak a lot for how you do business; if you’re working with a particularly rude or inappropriate client and still offer top notch support, it shows just how professionally you conduct business.

How to Ask for a Raise

Navigating your way as you climb the ladder at your job can be tricky. You want to fight for what you feel you deserve so you don’t sell yourself short without pushing too hard or overselling yourself. That can be a difficult rope to walk for those who want to advance in their careers without feeling like they’ve overstepped their boundaries. No, you shouldn’t ask for a raise your second week at the company, but you also should be compensated for tenure if you’ve remained with the company for a long time. If you’ve assessed the situation and truly feel as though you deserve a raise for all the work that you do, here are a few ways you can approach the subject of salary negotiation with your employer.

  • Prepare for the conversation.
    • Conversations about money are always a bit uncomfortable, so the worst thing that you can do is walk into the conversation unprepared and spring the question on your employer. Take the time to prepare before launching into a salary negotiation. You’ll be able to bring more solid points to the table and be able to defend your request.
  • Do not present your request as a complaint.
    • One of the worst things you can do during a salary negotiation is dredge up resentments to back up the fact that you want a raise. Been there for over a year? Gone a while since your last raise? Shouldering some extra work lately? All of that is fine and perfectly valid for wanting a raise, but it’s likely that your employer is already aware of this fact and for one reason or another hasn’t responded the way you’d prefer. Instead, bring to light accomplishments that may not have received a lot of attention or recent successes that you’ve had.
  • Show them the value you bring to the team.
    • If you want to earn more money for doing the same job, or want to undertake more responsibilities for greater pay, you need to make sure that you can actively demonstrate the value you that you provide to the company at large. Have you skillfully handled any difficult clients? Have you successfully increased profit margins for your department? Did you develop a system to streamline productivity and save the company time and money? Highlight the reasons why you feel as though a raise is deserved and help them see what you bring to the table.